Weavie Wonder

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photo credit: 0 Magazine Hair by: Kim Kimble

Time after time, the Nat-life Gurus go on a witch hunt in search of the next thing to shame people about. (You know it’s true, last year it was hair color).

So now the proverbial “Big Bad Wolf” is Weave!

Are there valid concerns as to the overall health of wearing a weave?

Absolutely. As I have always expressed an improperly installed weave can be devastating to your growth journey or scalp health.

Are there some people who lose themselves in Euro-centric standards of beauty?

Every day.

But, here are the benefits of a properly installed “Weave”

1. The ability to play with texture and color without causing any permanent change to your own hair. Versatility is a wonderful thing.

2. The remedy for hand in hair syndrome. You can get your flatiron fix on the fake hair and not wake up bald. This is especially true when none of your hair is out along the edges.

3. If cared for property hair inside of a weave can retain consistent moisture, which aides in growth and health. Moisture and protection from harsh conditions (extreme heat and cold) are part of a complete balanced hair routine.

You were able to see in a previous journey gallery that fake hair doesn’t have to be harmful nor does it have to play into any stereotypes and can actually ease you into embracing your own hair along the way.

Don’t let the internet bullies define your style. If your hair is protected, that’s a Protective Style.

Have you been wondering about this? Share your story in the Comment Section below.

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Braid it up, Sew it in

English: Chameleon hair extensions, Smithfield...

English: Chameleon hair extensions, Smithfield Market, Winetavern Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland, January 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We received a great question from one of our readers this week that is natural, but looking to explore the wide world of weave.

“when you used to wear sew-in’s how did you take care of your hair? how did you wash it? i am considering trying it for the first time but I’m unsure about it.”

Let’s break this down into sections. There are two parts to care for in a sew-in. The hair that grows, and the hair that shows.

The hair that shows most likely comes with instructions for care. There are many types of hair extensions so for that, just be mindful of the packaging.

The hair that grows needs to start off strong. I suggest a deep conditioning treatment immediately prior. Throughout the life of the style, the scalp should not be left to dry out. Remember that the string in this style is most likely made of polyester which will absorb the moisture from the braids at the base. If you intend to keep the style over a long period of time, I suggest professional assistance when cleansing.

A sew-in is a great alternative when applied properly. Know the difference between secure and tight, and do not ignore the signs of undue tension like small white bumps at the hairline, severe pain, or the inability to make facial expressions (we’ve all been there).

Overall, a sew-in will provide the flexibility to style with heat, forget your scarf here and there and play a bit more without worrying so much about daily damage. This can count as a protective style, if it is applied correctly and professionally maintained. Try it!

Thanks for asking questions folks, keep them coming!

Protective Styles

In the natural hair community, you hear lots of people throwing around the term “protective style”. This term has been attached to some pretty damaging styles so let’s break down what needs to be taking place to qualify.

Condition 1- Moisture is not being rapidly drained from the hair.  Synthetic hair and wood products wick away moisture from your hair.

Condition 2- The hair is not being pulled at unsafe tension levels. Pulling hair too tightly  in braids can cause the hair to fall out in the high stress areas.

Condition 3- There is not a daily duty to constantly re-style and manipulate using heat or a comb. Excessive flat ironing or combing around edges of weaves for “blending” purposes leaves your hairline still in jeopardy.

We spent a little time on YouTube this weekend and noticed that there were some tight twists, mock locs, yarn wraps and weaves being labeled as protective styles. It’s not so much that they were incorrectly labeled, as they were not accompanied with the level of information that a newbie DIY hair Diva needs to know. Moisture regimens as well as how long to keep a particular style with a particular medium (fabrics, synthetic hair, etc.) were all missing from some of the Kitchmatology  tutorials.

By no means are we saying stay away from, weaves, braids or wraps. We are saying remember why you’re getting the style in the first place. There may be instances that you have a style that you need to achieve for a certain occasion and in many of those cases you won’t keep the style for long. But if you are seeking a protective style for the purpose of giving your hair a rehabilitative break, keep in mind the points listed above. Remember you want to send your hair on vacation, not a work trip.

 

We love the style posted above by the way! Versatile, extremely low maintenance, and hair is available to be thoroughly moisturized.

As usual, ask questions when things stop making sense. Enjoy!